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Welcome to a new blog post in the category of vita-thieves. In the first post of this category I presented an overview of 4 typical fields, in which vita-thieves can be divided: Field One – Luxury foods and light drugs √ Field Two – Foods…

These Micro Elements are Important and probably Essential for Us

trace elements

This blog post differentiates a bit from the previous ones because we will get to know a group of micro elements which are seen as non-essential at the moment what doesn´t mean that they are not important for us. For me, the importance of each of these micro elements is not as big enough at the moment in order to write a single blog post for each of them alone. But each of them is truly mentionable.

So let´s get started with seeing which non-essential micro elements we will investigate here.

  1. Arsenic
  2. Boron
  3. Lithium
  4. Nickel
  5. Rubidium
  6. Tin
  7. Vanadium

Every specific (non)-essential micro element will be described in the style of the following structure in the manner of short questions, short answers:

  • What is it?
  • What is the estimated demand if available?
  • Where can you get it from?
  • What are the benefits and functions of it?
  • What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?
  • What else might be interesting?

What does it mean when I say important and probably essential?

imprtant

The importance of the following micro elements can be seen in the functions, which every single one of them is fulfilling in our body.

The possible non-essentiality can be seen in the ability of other micro elements to be a replacement as they can fulfill their functions too.

But we also have to confirm that at the moment the research for many of these micro elements isn´t fully complete and new conclusions can always be made.

So as long as we know that these micro elements are doing a great job within us by completing important functions in our body we should not neglect them and sweep them under the carpet.

 

1. Arsenic
arsenic

What is it?

Arsenic is a metalloid and a toxic heavy metal, which mostly comes in compounds belonging to the group of sulfides.

What is the estimated demand if available?

The possible estimated demand is 5 – 50 μg per day and it is not toxic until 1 mg.

Where can you get it from?

High amounts can be found in seafood and tap water.

What are the benefits and functions of it?

Although specific high amounts of arsenic are highly toxic for us, lower amounts of it can stimulate our organism as it promotes the development of red blood cells and supports the carbohydrate metabolism.

What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

Deficiency symptoms aren´t known yet for humans but for animals like rats and chicken development disorders are known.

Acute overdose symptoms of arsenic are gastrointestinal disorders. Slight overdoses of arsenic over a long time can lead to cancer and neurological disorders. More than 60 mg of arsenic is deadly.

What else might be interesting?

About 7 mg of arsenic can be found in our body, mostly in muscles, bones, kidneys, liver and lungs.

Charcoal and sulfurous foods like garlic can reduce the amount of arsenic in our body. Poisoning can be reduced with dimercaptopropane sulfonic acid (DMPA).

Arsenic and its compounds are today used in natural medicine (homeopathy for restlessness), against narcolepsy and leukemia.

The name arsenic comes from the Greek word “arsenikón”, which originates from orpiment. The name arsenic in the periodic table was established in 1814.

 

2. Boronbrain

What is it?

Boron is a metalloid, which is rare and comes in compounds such as borax and kernite.

What is the estimated demand if available?

The possible estimated demand is 1 – 2 mg per day. Boron is an ultra-trace element (<1μg/kg bodyweight) for us.

Where can you get it from?

It is found in nearly all food and in water.

What are the benefits and functions of it?

Boron plays a role in the bone and brain metabolism. Moreover, it stimulates the production and distribution of testosterone, estrogen and vitamin D. And it supports our immune system.

What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

Deficiency symptoms aren´t known yet for humans but for animals and plants as it is an essential ultra-trace element for them. Symptoms like hormonal disorders, osteoporosis and a low immune system cannot be specifically associated with low boron levels.

Overdose symptoms of boron include headaches, diarrhea and kidney failure. Compounds like borane are highly toxic to us.

What else might be interesting?

Our body consists of 0.7 ppm (parts per million) of boron on average.

The name boron comes from the Persian word “bura” and the Latin word “borax”, a compound of sodium bicarbonate and boron. Boron was discovered in 1808.

 

3. Lithiumlithium battery

    What is it?

    Lithium is an alkaline metal and a light metal, which is highly reactive in its free form.

    What is the estimated demand if available?

    The possible estimated demand is 0,8 mg per day. Lithium is an ultra-trace element (<1μg/kg bodyweight) for us.

    Where can you get it from?

    Lithium can be found in mineral water, grain and animal products.

    What are the benefits and functions of it?

    Lithium increases the serotonin-level, whereas it is used to treat psychological disorders. Probably it is also important within the enzyme metabolism. Moreover, it improves the brain power and prolongs your life.

    What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

    Deficiency symptoms aren´t known yet. But it is estimated that low lithium levels increase the risk of abortion.

    Overdose symptoms are only known through lithium-containing medicine. Probable symptoms are muscle twitching, high blood pressure, kidney damage, bone decrease, thyroid-gland under-function and gastrointestinal problems.

    What else might be interesting?

    Lithium can be found in nearly all organs throughout the body.

    Medicine uses lithium not only for light depression but also for cluster-headaches.

   The name lithium comes from the Greek “lithos”, which means stone and it was discovered in 1817.

 

4. Nickelnickel

    What is it?

    Nickel is a transition metal and a heavy metal.

    What is the estimated demand if available?

    The possible estimated demand is 0.03 mg per day.

    Where can you get it from?

    High amounts can be found in cocoa, nuts, pulses and black tea.

    What are the benefits and functions of it?

    Nickel fulfills important functions within the enzyme and carbohydrate metabolism. It promotes the formation of DNA and helps to increase the absorption of iron. 

    What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

    Deficiency symptoms of nickel are seldom. It may lead to metabolism disorders which lead to weakness and fatigue. A decreased iron absorption may also be a symptom.

    In overdoses, nickel can be highly toxic for us. Acute symptoms are gastrointestinal problems and neurological disorders. Chronic symptoms include cancer and neurological symptoms like headaches and vertigo.

    What else might be interesting?

    Low amounts of nickel are harmless to most people, but it can be dangerous for people, who are allergics. Allergic symptoms can develop through contact with nickel, like dermatitis. Food containing nickel, like the one above can lead to overreactive symptoms like gastrointestinal disorders, circulatory problems and skin inflammation. Nickel being breathed in can lead to lung cancer.

  The name nickel comes from the Swedish word “nickelin”, from the mineral copper-nickel and it was discovered in 1751.

 

5. Rubidiumcoffee-beans

    What is it?

    Rubidium is an alkaline metal, which is highly ignitable when coming in contact with air. It is an ultra-trace element in our body.

    What is the estimated demand if available?

    The possible estimated demand is up to 100 μg per day.

    Where can you get it from?

    High amounts can be found in tea and coffee, with values up to 15 mg/100g.

    What are the benefits and functions of it?

    Rubidium predominantly works in the central nerve system. There it ensures an optimal nerve connection and regulates the number of neurotransmitters. There are some estimations in which rubidium supports a proper pregnancy. Some research results show that rubidium may be an active substance for curing depression.

    What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

    Deficiency symptoms aren´t known yet for humans but it is probable for patients getting a dialysis.

    Overdose symptoms are not known, as surplus rubidium can be excreted through the urine.

    What else might be interesting?

    About 360 mg of rubidium can be found in a body of a 70 kg person on average, mostly in the intercellular fluid of the cells of the muscles, the heart and the brain.

    The functions of rubidium can also be fulfiled by potassium.

   The name rubidium comes from the Latin word “rubidus”, which means ruby red or dark red.

   It was discovered in 1861.

 

6. Tintin

    What is it?

    Tin is a heavy metal, which isn´t toxic for us in low amounts.

    What is the estimated demand if available?

    The possible estimated demand is 3 – 17 mg per day.

    Where can you get it from?

    High amounts can be found in asparagus, seafood and in food stored in cans.

    What are the benefits and functions of it?

    The function of tin in our body is not clear yet. It is estimated that it plays a role within oxidation and degradation processes.

    What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

    For humans, there are no experiences with deficiency and overdose symptoms. For animals deficiencies have led to development disorders.

    What else might be interesting?

    Tin can be found in our body mainly in the areas of the stomach and the gut (gastrointestinal tract) and in the liver.

    Whereas metallic tin isn´t toxic to us, also in greater amounts some organic compounds containing tin are highly toxic. An example is tributyltin, which is used for ship hulls in order to reduce the number of microorganisms and shells. Tributyltin leads to a denaturation of some proteins like cysteine because it interacts with the sulfur in the amino acids.

  Tin is known and used since some thousand years before christ and the word comes from the Old High German word “zin”, which means rod.

 

7. Vanadium

tools

    What is it?

    Vanadium is a transition metal.

    What is the estimated demand if available?

    The possible estimated demand is 30 μg per day.

    Where can you get it from?

    High amounts can be found in plant oil, pulses and nuts.

    What are the benefits and functions of it?

    It is described that vanadium works in the carbohydrate, the fat and the protein metabolism. There it stabilizes the blood sugar, protects the LDL (low density lipoprotein), stimulates phospholipids, regulates cholesterol and enzymes and supports the mineralization of the bones. Moreover, it participates in the iron metabolism.

    What are possible deficiency/overdose symptoms?

    Deficiency symptoms aren´t known yet.

    Overdose symptoms, beginning with more than 10 mg, which is normally only possible through air intake, are gastrointestinal problems, psychological disorders and muscle cramps.

    What else might be interesting?

    About 100 μg of vanadium can be found in our body, mostly in the bones, the liver, the lungs and  the spleen.

    The name vanadium comes from the Nordic word “vanadis”, which is a side name of Freyja, a Nordic god. In 1801 vanadium was first discovered.

 

Summary:

In this blog post, we had a clear look at the micro elements arsenic, boron, lithium, nickel, rubidium, tin and vanadium. These are all micro elements, which fulfill important functions for us and they aren´t yet scientifically identified as essential for us.

You should only know, that they can be necessary in specific cases.
For arsenic, you should know that it is used in homeopathy for restlessness.
Boron is important for our hormone, brain and bone metabolism.
Lithium influences our serotonin-level and can help with depression.
Nickel plays a role in our protein and carbohydrate metabolism.
Rubidium ensures a proper function within our nervous system.
Tin is described to support the production of gastric juices, which promotes a good digestion.
Vanadium works diversely in the carbohydrate, the fat and the protein metabolism.

You see. Every micro element mentioned above fulfills an important function for us. So that is why we made an overview of them.


Now to you. What do you think? What was interesting here for and what do you want to know more about? Let us know in the comments.

Is Fluorine toxic for Us? – The Scaffolder (non essential)

The next non-essential micro element in our row is fluorine. It is well-known by many, controversial and today we will find an answer to the question “Is Fluorine toxic for Us – The Scaffolder”. That in combination with a wide use in daily products have…

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What are the Benefits of Silicon for Us? – Like Sand on the Sea for Your Skin, Hair and Nails

sand at the beach

Our next essential micro element exists like sand on the sea. Although science is not completely consistent with it, it is acceptable to see it as essential for now. So, we will have a look at silicon and we are going to find an answer to the question “What are the Benefits of Silicon for Us? – Like Sand on the Sea for Your Skin, Hair and Nails”. And we will also have a look at how much you need of it and what else might be interesting about this micro element.


Why is Silicon like sand on the beach for your skin, hair and nails?skin, hair and nails

Fortunately, silicon is the second most recurrent element on earth after oxygen. So it not only exists like sand on the sea literally but sand is mostly silicon dioxide.

Although the effect of silicon in our body isn´t understood deeply, we know that silicon can be found in nearly all cells in our body.

In fast dividing cells like your skin, hair and nail cells the amount of silicon is particularly high.

However, the most common form of silicon, namely silicon dioxide, isn´t very good biologically available. And who wants to eat sand by the way.

As silica or in food high in silicon as shown below, the biological availability is much higher.

So now that we know that silicon plays an important and a probably essential role in several processes in our body, we are ready to go further into the world of this micro element.

 

What is Silicon?

Silicon is a transition metal. As the compound silicon dioxide SiO2 (sand) it is the second most element on earth. Silicon can be found in nearly every cell within our body. The best biological availability can be found for natural silica like orthosilicate or orthosilicic acid.

Silicon is also known for its use as a semiconductor in microelectronics or solar cells.

It is for now seen as an essential micro or trace element, which we have to get through our nutrition, although there may be institutions, which don´t declare it as essential. In many cases, it is also declared as an ultra-trace element because the definite essentiality was only found in the animal model under extreme conditions.

 

What is the demand for Silicon?

At the moment there is no recommendation for the daily intake of silicon. There are estimations, that about 30 mg/day seem to be good.

 

Where can you get Silicon from (Top foods)?

Here are the Top foods, which are rich in Silicon:

millet1. Millet and oat (up to 200 mg/100g),oats

2. Nuts and cheese (up to 100 mg/100g)

3. Pulses like lentils (up to 70 mg/100g)

4. Grain and eggs (up to 50 mg/100g)

Rich in silicon are also nettles and beer, where it is really good biologically available.

 

water

potatoespeanuts

What are the functions and benefits of Silicon?

The most important function of silicon is its effect on the metabolism, predominantly for fast-dividing cells, like skin, hair and nails.

Effect within our metabolism

Silicon can be found in nearly all cells throughout our body. But especially in fast-growing cells like skin, hair and nail cells the amount of it is very high so that we can originate that silicon plays an important role in these areas. So there needs to be some more research to be done.

Moreover, silicon plays a role in developing stable bones, strong connective tissue and healthy blood vessels.

It stimulates the immune system and supports the formation of immune cells.

Finally, silicon is also there to store water in the body and to excrete heavy metals from the body. It is also possible to take it as a detoxifier for light poisoning.

 

What deficiency symptoms of Silicon exist?

A deficiency of silicon is very seldom, as we can find big amounts of it in food. If your diet is very one-sided or under extreme conditions it may lead to the followed symptoms:

  • dry skin, nails and hair
  • decreased bone flexibility
  • osteoporosis

 

What overdose symptoms of Silicon exist?

An overdose of silicon is quite unusual. Just with amounts of significantly more than 1000 mg a hemolysis with a degradation of red blood cells and kidney stones may develop. Breathing in silicon can lead to silicosis and lung disease, which leads to breathing difficulties.

 

What else may you have to consider about Silicon? 

Value in our body

The amount of silicon in our body is about 20 mg/kg bodyweight, which is about 1.4 g on average.

Antagonists and Advice

The less calcium, magnesium, phosphorus, zinc and manganese exists in the bones, the less silicon can be integrated into the body. Whereas food high in fiber contains the highest amonts of silicon, the biological availability isn´t high. In this case, organic silicic acid or silica is much more available for us.

like pebble stones

Discovery and Use

Silicon is known since the stone age. Since the beginning of the 19th century it was possible to produce it industrially in compounds and in 1854 silicon firstly was discovered in its free form.

Etymology

The word silicon comes from the Latin words “silicia”, which means silica and “silex”, which means pebble.

 

Summary:

Although the research situation is not completely clear for silicon, it can be seen as an essential micro element for us at the moment, as it was found to be essential for animals. We can conclude that silicon plays an important role within our metabolism as we can find it in nearly every cell in our body. The highest concentration of it is located in the fast-dividing cells of our skin, hair and nails. Furthermore, it supports strong bones, connective tissue and our immune system. Lastly, silicon also works as a detoxifier for heavy metals. Food high in fiber like oat and nettles are a good choice for silicon in food. In (non-alcoholic) beer the availability for our body is even higher.


It is your turn now. What was new here for you? Do you want to know something else? Let us know in the comments.

Is Chromium really Good for Weight Loss? – The Sugar – Lover!

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What are the Benefits of Manganese? – The Multi-Enzyme-Supporter!

hazelnut

Getting over to another rather uncommon but essential micro element, we will have a look at manganese and we are going to find an answer to the question “What are the Benefits of Manganese? – The Multi-Enzyme-Supporter!”. And we will also have a look at the reasons why manganese is important for us, how much you need of it and what else might be interesting about this micro element.


Why can we call Manganese the Multi-Enzyme-Supporter?lock

As it is the case for many of the micro nutrients that are existing, one of the most important tasks of manganese is its support within enzymes and therefore in metabolic processes in our body.

Manganese is a direct and/or indirect component of enzymes, which promote the formation of body substances. Often the source for this formation originated from macro nutrients and the conversion of them in our metabolism. For this manganese, which also works as an antioxidant, is indispensable.

Later we are going to have a more in depth look at the most important functions of manganese in our body and how we benefit from it.

So now that we know that manganese plays an important and essential role in several metabolic processes in our body, we are ready to go further into the world of this micro element.

 

What is Manganese?

Manganese is a transition metal. Typical compounds containing manganese are pyrolusites, which are manganese oxides. In nature, manganese is not found as a free element.

It is an essential micro or trace element, which we have to get through our nutrition.

 

What is the demand of Manganese?

Depending on the age, health and lifestyle the daily demand for an average and healthy adult for manganese is about

1.800 – 2.300 micrograms (μg) per day.

 

Where can you get Manganese from (Top foods)?

Here are the Top foods, which are rich in Manganese:

oat flakes1. Hazelnuts (up to 5.500 μg/100g),berries

2. Oat flakes (up to 4.500 μg/100g)

3. Blueberries (up to 4.000 μg/100g)

4. Pulses (up to 2.500 μg/100g)

5. Brown rice (up to 2.000 μg/100g)pulses

 

rice

 

 

 

What are the functions and benefits of Manganese?

The most important function of manganese is its effect on the enzyme metabolism.

Function as a cofactor/component of an enzyme

Manganese ensures the efficient processes within our body to produce bone substance and connective tissue. Therefore it takes part in the enzymatical driven conversion, the synthesis and the supply of carbohydrates, protein and fat in our body. To do this it amongst others intervenes in the insulin and urea production. Insulin promotes our body to absorb more glucose, which leads to a decrease in blood sugar after a meal. Urea is used to excrete the smallest unused parts of proteins, the nucleic acids.

In redox reactions, manganese can work as an antioxidant to catch free radicals and it supports the formation of oxygen producing enzymes.

 

Hormone production

Manganese participates within the development of several important hormones in our body, such as insulin and dopamine. Dopamine gives us the possibility to feel happiness. Skin pigments, such as melanin have to rely on manganese for their production.

 

What deficiency symptoms of Manganese exist?

A deficiency of manganese is very seldom, as it is available in great amounts in food. Probable risk factors are a one-sided diet, oxidative stress and alcoholism.

A smaller deficiency in manganese can lead to the followed symptoms:

  • bone structure disorders
  • neurologic disorders
  • psychological disorders
  • development and fertility disorders
  • disorders in the energy metabolism

 

What overdose symptoms of Manganese exist?

An overdose of manganese isn´t normal through a weighted diet. It can become dangerous when significant amounts of manganese (compounds) are inhaled through the air. Then it has a neurotoxic effect on us.

Beginning at quite more than 50 mg/day may result in the following symptoms:

  • psychiatric and motor / movement disturbances
  • gout
  • gastrointestinal disorders
  • probably reproduction and development disorders (confirmed within animal research)
  • copper deficiency

 

What else may you have to consider about Manganese? 

Value in our body

The amount of manganese in our body is about 10 -40 mg. It is stored mostly in the bones (60 %), in the liver, in the kidneys, the pancreas, the muscles and as hair pigment.

Antagonists and Advice

Although magnesium works as an antagonist for manganese, it has the ability to replace manganese for a short period of time. Organically bound manganese as gluconate or chelate is better for our body to use than compounds like manganese sulfate.magnesia in greece

Discovery and Use

Manganese was first discovered in 1774.

Etymology

The word manganese comes from the Latin word “magnesia”, which is derived from a region in Greece, called magnesia, where manganese was found first.

 

Summary:

To summarize today´s blog post, we can capture, that manganese is an essential micro element for us and is indispensable in our protein, fat and carbohydrate metabolism, where it works as a component of multiple enzymes. It helps with the formation of bone substance and connective tissue as well as the formation of several hormones, such as insulin and dopamine. As an antioxidant, it catches free radicals. Nuts, oat and blueberries are a good choice for manganese in food.


Now it is your turn. What was important or new here for you? Do you want to know something else? Let us know in the comments.

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In this article, we are going to have a look at another rather uncommon but essential micro element. And the talk is of molybdenum to which we want to find an answer for the question “How does Molybdenum work in Your Body – The Enzyme…